The Skin-Care Tools Dermatologists Actually Use At Home

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The Skin-Care Tools Dermatologists Actually Use At Home featured image

Skin-care devices and “extras” seem to always have a huge, invisible question mark over them on store shelves. They tell us everything we want to hear, promising everything from less lines to better beauty sleep, but no matter how shiny they look in-stores, it’s tough to tell if they actually deliver on their claims, and ultimately, if they’re worth the usually steep pricetag.

While many tools can prove their worth almost instantly or show some serious results over time, others are better left behind. To find out which devices and skin-care boosters are actually worth our money (and time), we asked dermatologists which, if any, at-home tools they trust on their own skin.

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Facial Rollers

New York dermatologist Rita Linkner, MD is a big fan of lymphatic massage with a facial roller, noting she’s been using one every day for about six months now. She also notes that it’s less about the tool you’re using for lymphatic massage and more about technique. “The neck is the first place to begin the massage as it is the nexus that drains the lymphatics from the face,” she explains.

Another tip for best results: Use the jade or your-choice-of-crystal roller in the morning. “The results, while subtle, are short-lived, so there’s little point to doing it in the evening,” adds Dr. Linkner.

Our favorite rollers: Herbivore Jade Facial Roller ($30), which is also rumored to be Kate Moss’s favorite, or Skin Gym Rose Quartz Crystal Facial Roller ($28).

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High-Tech Cleansing Brush

“I have tried various devices over the years, but to be honest, I tend to get lazy when it comes to using some thing for several minutes every day,” admits San Antonio dermatologist Vivian Bucay, MD. What she has been faithful to, however? Her trusty Clarisonic brush, “especially now that there are various attachments that can be used for the application of skin care around the eye, face and neck,” she adds.

If you’re on the fence about making the investment, Dr. Bucay offers up some convincing stats. “The patented frequency of oscillations has been shown to increase collagen production—that means that not only does the Clarisonic remove dirt, oils and small particle pollutants better than other devices or manual washing, but also that using the device itself has benefits in ramping up collagen production.” Shop the Clarisonic Mia Smart ($169) here.

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Beauty-Sleep Boosters

Not a gadget per se, but a skin-care tool nonetheless, Nanuet, NY dermatologist Heidi Waldorf, MD says she loves her slip Silk Sleep Mask and Pillowcase ($122). “I have trouble sleeping, plus long time neck issues—I cannot switch from my side to my back. The slip products truly reduce the lines that are on my face when I wake up. I also use a My Pillow, which is filled with chopped up foam, so it doesn’t ‘fight’ my face.”

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High-Powered Microcurrent Tools

Microcurrent technology is a surefire way to sculpt and “tighten” skin in a matter of minutes. Though the effects are temporary, Miami dermatologist Martha H. Viera, MD says she uses her NuFace Facial Toning Kit ($325) at home to keep up the results of her in-office treatments.

“It has three attachments for improved facial contour and reduced wrinkle appearance,” adds Dr. Viera. “It also works on the eyes and neck, and it stimulates the larger surface areas of the face and neck to help improve tone and the look of fine lines and wrinkles.” While she admits to using it three nights a week during quarantine, she notes that users should reach for the device five days per week, and then two to three times per week once you hit the three-month mark.

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