Do Vitamins Actually Work?

In research published at the end of last year by the Annals of Medicine, the efficacy  of multivitamins was put on trial. The report described them as “a waste” and “ineffective,” stating that there is no real evidence that proves they provide any sort of benefit or ward off any sicknesses and disease. But since then, many experts have come to their defense, saying they do still recommend them, and, considering it’s a $30 billion business in the U.S., it’s doubtful they will disappear anytime soon.

The Plastic Surgeon
“The need for supplementation is unnecessary, despite the hype,” says Eugene, OR, plastic surgeon Mark Jewell, MD. “Most people are well nourished and, in most cases, a balanced diet contains enough vitamins and nutrients.”

The Nutritionist
“I’ve seen them help clients and myself,” says celebrity nutritionist Christine Avanti. “However, it is very difficult to find a good, high-quality multivitamin that works for each individual’s needs.”

The Dermatologist
“If you have a good diet, I don’t necessarily see how they make a difference, but some supplements are worth taking,” says San Antonio dermatologist Vivian Bucay, MD.

Did You Know?
According to the most recent CDC report, in the U.S., iron, vitamin B6 and vitamin D deficiencies are the most prevalent. But, overall, the report found less than 10 percent of the U.S. population had nutritional deficiencies.

Insider Tip:
Only your doctor can accurately diagnose you as vitamin deficient, usually with a simple blood test. It’s also recommended that you run any multivitamins or supplements you intend to take by your physician or health-care provider first