Is Neck Botox the Next Big Thing?

Add another thing that neurotoxins—Botox, Dysport and Xeomin—can do to the list: perfecting that often hard-to-treat area of the neck. “Neck Botox is a big trend that is only getting bigger,” explains Troy, MI, plastic surgeon Anthony Youn, MD.

Is It Safe?
While the FDA has not approved the use of neurotoxins for this specific solution, doctors have been doing it for awhile. “We’ve been doing botulinum toxin in the neck for more than a decade,” says New York dermatologist Heidi Waldorf, MD. “It’s not really brand-new, but it is being talked about in the media again.” 

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How Does It Work?
According to Dr. Youn, injecting Botox into the vertical neck bands (called platysmal bands) can cause the bands to smooth, and you will usually see the results in about a week. “This is because the bands are caused by the platysma muscle, which can become stretched out and droop with age. When this muscle contracts—like when you grimace or make certain facial expressions—it can cause vertical bands to form. Botox prevents the platysma from contracting, thereby smoothing the bands and the neck.” Adds Dr. Waldorf, “The areas between the bands can also be treated with microinjections of dilute botulinum toxin to soften it further.” An added bonus: Treating the neck and along the jawline is part of what is sometimes called the ‘Nefertiti lift’ because. in addition to improving the neck, it can help define the jawline, Dr. Waldorf explains.

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Is It Right for You?
While Dr. Youn says the injections are very effective, he emphasizes that they will not successfully lift a sagging neck. “The treatment is best suited for someone who doesn’t have significant sagging skin or submental (under chin) fat, but who has prominent platysmal bands and/or neck rings,” Dr. Waldorf says.

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