Fda-Approved Liquid Miracles

All of the main injectables and fillers available (think Botox, Restylane, etc.), regardless of how they work, are FDA-approved to treat specific concerns. Many dermatologists and plastic surgeons creatively inject these products off-label (meaning the product is used for something other than its FDA-approved use) to remedy other signs of aging. Off-label use typically doesn't pose any risks, as long as a board-certified, skilled and qualified expert injector, who is familiar with fillers and facial anatomy, is performing your injections. So why are these popular techniques not recognized by the FDA or promoted by the manufacturers themselves? New York dermatologist Heidi Waldorf, MD, says that for fillers and inejctables to get additional indications for use, the process is extremely lengthy and expensive. Below, are the approved uses for each category injectable:

1. Botox and Dysport (denervating agents)
Both reduce the muscle activity that gives animation to the face, like the area between the eyebrows. Botox is also FDA approved to control severe underarm sweating.
2. Restylane, Juvéderm and Perlane (hyaluronic acids)
Hyaluronic acid fillers are typically injected into the mid to deep layers of skin to plump up nasolabial folds.
3. Radiesse and Sculptura Aesthetic (collagen stimulators)
These fillers are for patients who need more moderate amounts of volume restoration particularly around the mouth and the jowls. “These act as a global revolumizer for the face as a whole,” says Boca Raton, FL, dermatologist Marta Rendon, MD.
4. Artefill (permanent filler)
This filler is approved for use in the nasolobial folds. Unlike other fillers, it is not absorbed over time, making potential complications harder to correct.