When Beauty Backfires: Trout Pout

Caused by: Overdone lip augmentation with fillers, fat or implants

What it looks like: Overinflated, rolled out or shapeless lips with an upper lip that’s usually larger than the bottom one. The lips can also look and feel hard to the touch.

Why it happens: If too much filler is placed in the upper white lip (the area directly under the nose) the lips appear shelf-like. If too much filler is injected into the Cupid’s bow, it may become lost. “Scar tissue forms around the injection site which only augments volume and leads to swelling,” says Newport Beach, CA, plastic surgeon Douglas Hendricks, MD. Silicone or implants can lead to a similar, if not worse, effect and hard-looking lips.

How to avoid it: Explain to your doctor exactly how much fullness you’re looking for. “Also, especially with the lips, less is more when you’re starting out with enhancement,” says Fairfax, VA, plastic surgeon Victoria Suh, MD. To ensure a natural look, both the white roll of the lips and the red line (where the dry part of the lips meets the wet part) should be injected.

How to reverse it: If hyaluronic acid fillers were used, your doctor can reverse the effects by injecting hyaluronidase into the lips. But, if a more permanent filler was used, it most likely needs to be surgically removed. It is usually impossible to remove all of the permanent filler. Implants can be taken out and resized.

1 Comment
  • Ashley Magovern Ashley Magovern
    Posted on

    This is a great post. I feel like most patients who need lip filler also need filler in other parts of the face to maintain that youthful balance. If someone has aging changes and volume loss in other parts of the face, adding a little filler elsewhere, like the cheeks, can make the lip filler look even better. Ironically, having perfect lips can look funny if the other parts of the face aren’t corrected too.

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