Three Simple Food Switches for a Slimmer Shape

In today’s fast-paced world, sticking to a diet and making healthy food choices for each and every meal can be a difficult, if not impossible, challenge. More times than not, most of us reach for whatever is the quickest and most convenient thing to eat, even if it means compromising calories and nutritional value. But implementing a few small tweaks to your daily diet can make a world of difference, fueling your body with the essentials needed.

Diet Secret 01: Stay fuller longer by including fiber-rich fruits and vegetables.
How it Works:
High-fiber diets are one mainstay that will never go out of style. “Fiber has the ability to keep you feeling fuller for longer so you’re less likely to overeat says Woodland Hills, CA, nutritionist Jonny Bowden. “Fiber also slows the entry of food into the blood stream, blunting blood sugar and insulin response, both of which can lead to cravings and fat storage.” Fiber-rich diets also offer multiple health benefits, like a decreased risk of heart disease and cancer. The easiest way to incorporate fiber into your diet is to load up on oranges, apples, carrots, beans, peas and oats. You can also opt for foods that contain added fiber, like cereals, breads and even low-calorie muffins, or supplements.

Diet Secret 02: Speed up your metabolism by adding cinnamon to your morning cup of coffee.
How it Works:
Not only does cinnamon add an extra boost of flavor, it also levels out your sugar metabolism, meaning it causes your stomach to empty food slower than normal so your blood sugar doesn’t spike. When blood sugar levels are stable, you’re less likely to binge or crave sugary and sweet foods. And there’s no limit to how much cinnamon you can use. Try sprinkling it on fruit, like apples, or add it into green tea, fruit smoothies and even coffee.

Diet Secret 03: Get more nutrients out of your carbs by switching one brown bread food for a whole sprouted grain every week.
How it Works:
Most white carbohydrates offer nothing more than empty calories. Just as filling as their white counterparts, brown rice, whole wheat bread, pasta and pizza, as well as other types of whole grains, pack a powerful punch of “protein, fiber and nutrients,” says Kansas City, MO, nutrition expert Mitzi Dulan. But, still, brown breads won’t provide you with the quantity and quality of nutrients that sprouted grains (whole wheat kernels that sprout, are ground up and then baked into bread) can. Adds Bowden, “The only ‘real’ whole grain breads are those that have sprouted grains, like Food for Life’s Ezekiel Organic Sprouted Whole Grain breads, which have two to three grams of fiber per slice.” 

  • If you regularly eat whole grain bread, try sprouted grain bread instead
  • If you favor brown rice, opt for quinoa or bulgur wheat
  • If you like whole wheat crackers, choose flax seed crackers as an alternative every week, switch one brown bread food for a whole sprouted grain