Your Sunscreen Still Might Not Protect You

Take heed when choosing SPF for your upcoming summer vacation-the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has allowed manufacturers more time to update the labels on their over-the-counter sunscreens to state just how much protection they really give.

Earlier this year, we reported that the new FDA standards for sunscreen would start this summer, but manufacturers said the year-long deadline was too hard to meet. That's why major sunscreen makers will have six more months-until December 2012, to make the changes, while smaller companies will have even more time, until December 2013, to update their labels.

It's a small win for the brands, but some say it's at the cost of the consumer since the SPF confusion will continue past sunbathing season. Right now, sunscreens only disclose their level of protection against UVB radiation, not UVA, although both can lead to skin cancer. Under the new regulations, the labels will state what level of "broad spectrum" protection they actually provide (if they do), and will cap off at SPF 50+.

Do you think the FDA should allow manufacturers more time to update their labels?

Related:
Sunscreen Regulation Debate: Is the FDA Doing the Right Thing?