Viola Davis Is 'Worth It' as the New Face of L'Oréal

Photo Credits: Samir Hussein / Contributor/ Getty Images

If you’ve seen Season 1, Episode four of How to Get Away With Murder, in which Viola Davis’ Annalise Keating unceremoniously removes her wig, lashes and makeup during a pivotal scene, you won’t be surprised by the announcement that Davis is the new face of L’Oréal Paris. In that unforgettable moment, the actress revealed true natural beauty with her strength and poise as she stripped off all her external adornments. Now, she’s putting them back on as the face of L’Oréal in a move that has her joining Eva Longoria, Helen Mirren and Céline Dion as a brand ambassador. 

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Davis, who told PEOPLE that she never associated herself with “beauty or femininity,” shared on Twitter, “The self-affirming words of, ‘Because I’m worth it’ have always given me chill bumps. What a joy it will be to not just say them over and over again...but to spread the message of worth to women around the world. It is a gift.”

In her new role, the star will appear in advertising campaigns for the brand’s Age Perfect skin-care line. “We are thrilled to welcome Viola as a member of our family,” stated Delphine Viguier-Hovasse, Global Brand President for L’Oréal Paris. “Viola’s tenacity, authenticity, and bold spirit resonate with and inspire so many people. She challenges the status quo in all aspects of life and her drive to succeed has proven itself time after time—she leads by example and is the perfect conduit to elevate our core message, ‘Because I’m Worth It.’”

Being a part of a new conversation around beauty standards is what Davis is most proud of. As she told PEOPLE, she never thought of herself as someone who could fill this type of role. “I didn’t think that I had all those attributes that women who are seen like that should have.” Now, Davis is part of a growing trend of brand ambassadors who are representative of all types of beauty and reshaping the narrative for girls and women everywhere. Annalise Keating would be proud.