Estée Lauder Companies Just Made Major Strides in the Fight Against Animal Testing

Photo Credits: DenisMArt/ Shutterstock

Whether you’re a dog lover, a crazy cat lady or even a bird watcher, you should know about the animal cruelty that occurs worldwide in the cosmetic market: At least 115 million animals are exposed to product testing yearly, according to Cruelty-Free International, an animal protection group. Today, the beauty titans at Estée Lauder Companies—comprised of brands such as MAC, Smashbox, Becca Cosmetics, Bumble and bumble., Bobbi Brown and La Mer, to name a few—announced their new partnership with the Humane Society, making huge strides in the fight to change this horrific statistic. Their shared goal is new local and global legislation, promoting anti-animal-testing policies through the discovery of alternative ways to check product safety. 

The Estée Lauder Companies proudly pledge to #BeCrueltyFree and we commend the initiative that will, in turn, save millions of animals. While many brands in the company's portfolio have already been deemed cruelty free by PETA such as Becca, Smashbox, and Too Faced, Estée Lauder Companies are fighting the larger fight to globally terminate all animal testing, following the footsteps of other activist brands like Coty, Unilever and Procter & Gamble.

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Anna Klein, the senior vice president of global corporate affairs for Estée Lauder Companies spoke on behalf of the beauty conglomerate about their newly declared partnership. “We are proud to partner with Humane Society International, an organization that has done such thoughtful work advocating for animals everywhere. They have been a wonderful partner and advisor as we work together towards our common goal to bring an end to cosmetics animal testing, worldwide." The Estée Lauder Companies state on their website that in order to end the cruelty, they must propose sustainable solutions that can replace animal testing of products, rather than simply urging others to stop. The solution, they argue, must be practical, which is why they donate to a plethora of enterprises, all listed on their website, searching for the best alternative to animal testing. 


Despite the fact that the Estée Lauder Companies have committed to no internal animal testing for more than 30 years, they run into a severe issue when dealing with the global market. Many nations, such as China, the largest example, demand animal testing of cosmetic ingredients before importation into their country, regardless of their original manufacturing location. As a beauty industry leader with more than 25 brands selling products to more than 150 different nations, does Estée Lauder comply to these harsh requirements?  They claim, on their “Point of View” online page, that they urge the bodies who demand animal testing to review and accept their non-animal tested data. However, this is a plight all cosmetic brands face when trying to sell globally, resulting in many companies hiring a third party to test their products on animals.

Legislation is definitely moving in the right direction—the state of California has recently banned the sale and importation of any animal-tested products—and we thank these courageous brands for fighting this paramount fight.