New Snow White Film Faces Criticism After Misguided Body Shaming Poster Goes Viral

Photo Credits: Getty Images

Some might say we’ve come a long way in terms of body diversity as recent campaigns from brands like Dove, JCPenney and Target feature a variety of different body shapes, all in a positive light. But in another instance of “we just aren’t there yet,” an ad for the new Snow White parody Red Shoes & the 7 Dwarfs is coming under fire for blatant body shaming and sending a very negative message about bodies that don’t fit the “norm.”

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Plus-size model and body positive advocate Tess Holliday spotted the poster and quickly pointed out the harmful message it conveys. The meant to be lighthearted poster shows a side-by-side comparison of a tall, slim and trim Snow White with a shorter, rounder, plumper version next to the tagline, “What if Snow White was no longer beautiful and the 7 Dwarfs not so short?” The takeaway for anyone reading it is, beauty can only be attained by having what society considers “perfect” proportions. Holliday wasn’t having it and tagged voiceover star Chloë Grace Moretz in her tweet.

It didn’t take long for Moretz to respond with a series of her own tweets, fully disapproving of the film’s marketing approach while also stressing that the poster does not speak for her or the full message behind the film. “The actual story is powerful for young women and resonated with me. I am sorry for the offense that was beyond my creative control,” tweeted Moretz.

There is no response yet from the film’s production company, Locus Creative Studio, nor is there an official release date for the animated feature. Hopefully by the time it does come out in theaters there will be a better, less-offensive strategy to highlight the various plot twists in the film. 


1 Comment
  • Rose
    Posted on

    It's ironic that there is a storm in a teacup about a marketing team who is just telling the truth. I know what it's like to be fat in both American and Australian society, and there is nothing untrue about how being short and dumpy makes you less desirable to most other people. I was also "the fat kid" growing up. Telling kids that obesity is good isn't going to make them believe it is; the fat kid will be ostracized because they are less physically-able to partake in most children's' activities (except reading and art).

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